Offshore Wind 101

Offshore Wind 101

The content below is provided courtesy of the NYSERDA New York State Energy Research & Development Authority

Renewable energy, specifically offshore wind is changing the way we live our lives for generations. The strong wind resource off the U.S. Atlantic coast has tremendous renewable energy generation potential. 


Height comparisons:

  • Statue of Liberty: 305 ft.

  • Empire State Building: 1,454 ft.

  • Average Onshore U.S. Turbine: 466 ft.

  • Tallest Onshore U.S. Turbine: 574 ft.

  • Block Island Offshore Wind Project: 590 ft.

  • GE Haliade-X Offshore Turbine: 853 ft.

Comparison of the heights of onshore and offshore wind turbines with Statue of Liberty and Empire State Building.

How It Works

Offshore wind turbines work to harness the ocean’s vast wind and convert it into 100% renewable electricity.

Overview of Power Generation


  1. Offshore Turbines capture the wind's energy and generate electricity.

  2. Foundations secure turbines to the ocean floor and cables transmit electricity to an offshore substation

  3. Electricity flows through a buried cable to an onshore substation and is transferred to the existing transmission network.



Export Cable. The export cable is buried deep enough to avoid disturbing ocean users and wildlife, and it transmits power from the offshore substation to the onshore substation.

  1. Cable Landing. Horizontal direction drilling, a common method for landing export transmission cables from offshore wind farms, minimizes environmental impacts and disruption to beaches and the shoreline.

  2. Onshore Connection. Electricity is transferred to the existing transmission network.

Graphic showing how power gets from the offshore substation to the onshore substation. The buried export cable transmits power from the offshore substation to the onshore substation. Electricity is then transferred to the existing transmission network.

Powered By GrowthZone